Hot water heat recovery

What device(s) to put where to recapture as much of the heat from waste / grey water needs a decision.

The solutions from www.recoupenergysolutions.co.uk are clearly all very efficient and appear to be the same or similar to those that are well used in the US, where a lot of properties have their heating systems in the basement.

They are based on an “instant” transfer of the waste water heat to the mixer in the shower and also to the cold water feed to the water heating system.

BUT, the planned house will have clothes washing machines, a dishwasher and 2 showers on the ground floor. Being on the ground floor they wouldn’t work with all the¬†recoupenergy solutions. Also a washing machine, dishwasher, bath (or hot tub) generates the waste water, some time after the hot water tank has been re-filled with mains cold water.

So in those circumstances, the www.esavep.com/products/hot-water-cylinders Heat Squirrel (scroll to the bottom) could be better and could provide a single (so a lot cheaper) whole house solution for all waste / grey hot water heat recovery. They are about £399 (not installed). The heat squirrel has a 120 litre capacity.

A key consideration / idea will be:

Can the waste water input be regulated so that only waste water that is warmer than the water in the heat squirrel is let in to it?

It seems that for a shower, the recoupenergy solutions will be the most efficient, but for the whole house, and the total cost, a single heat squirrel could be better than a heat squirrel and one or more recoupenergy solutions.

Heat Squirrel Schematic

Heat Squirrel - schematic
Heat Squirrel - installed

Frame colour – RAL 5007

As per the planning application, the triple glazed windows are going to be framed in a grey / blue that ties in with the current grey / blue colouring of the current (original) Silver Spray building:

Silver Spray from the road (Google Earth)

The front garage and sign are a lighter blue than the blue on the building:

Silver Spray sign

DSCN0492_600w

The surrounding houses have also gone for shades of blue:

Neighbouring blues

By going to Silver Spray and comparing the colours to a RAL colour chart, the colour that seems the best match is RAL 5007.

It’s hard to show this on a screen, as different monitors and different graphics cards will show the same colour differently. But here are some attempts. The first is from a Google image search on “RAL 5007”.

RAL 5007 image search on Google

Then from a window company (http://www.plastixal.pl/www/fr/425,palette_de_couleurs.html)¬†that shows different painted frames (well the corner, so the colour impact is bigger than it’ll actually be !).

RAL 5007 for glazing frames - 03

RAL 5007 for glazing frames - 02

RAL 5007 colour swatch

 

 

Kitchen layout planning

Some tips on “How to Plan a Kitchen Workflow That Works” from¬†http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/5650992/:

  • Aim to have at least 18 inches of counter space on either side before putting in other appliances ‚ÄĒ with the exception of an undercounter dishwasher, of course, which works perfectly right next to the sink.
  • put counters around the refrigerator too, so there’s room to set down items when raiding the fridge.
  • While Alper likes putting a cooktop on an island, so the cooking is integrated into socializing, others like that space to be completely clear.

and ideas to “Stash Small Kitchen Appliances” from¬†http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/5656156/:

  • Don’t let these clutter up the surfaces.

stash kitechen appliances - 01

Article on the pro’s and con’s of different carpet types

http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/1407736?utm_source=Houzz&utm_campaign=u76&utm_medium=email&utm_content=gallery22

WOOL
Pros

  • Hides soil
  • Strong, elastic and resilient; great for heavy traffic
  • Responds very well to cleaning, as moisture makes the fiber swell and release dirt
  • Naturally flame retardant
  • Neutralizes indoor air contaminants and does not reemit them
  • Environmentally friendly

Cons

  • High cost
  • Prone to distortion by excess agitation
  • Stains easily, due to its absorbency and ease of dyeing
  • Very sensitive to chlorine bleach

 

NYLON

Pros

  • Most commonly used fiber; readily available in a wide range of colors and textures
  • Good elasticity ‚ÄĒ very important in heavy traffic areas where furniture may be dragged across the carpet
  • Abrasion resistant, surpassing even wool
  • Wear guaranties often available
  • Resilient; can be crushed for long periods and regain its original shape
  • Responds very well to most professional cleaning methods and treatments

Cons

  • Can have problems with bleaching, fading, urine reactions and so on
  • Synthetic, so it off-gases

 

SISAL
Pros

  • Can stand up to high traffic; good for stairs
  • Gives your room a great natural look while adding texture
  • Biodegradable and nontoxic

Cons

  • Uncomfortable against bare skin
  • Can be pricey (but generally less so than wool)
  • Susceptible to moisture damage
  • Can be difficult to clean

Sewage treatment

Although the main pipe that goes from Perranporth to the sewage treatment plant by Cligga goes past the front of the house, that is under pressure and isn’t a pipe we can discharge into.

At the moment Silver Spray is a soakaway !

So, as the house is being “upgraded” we’ll be fitting an on-site sewage treatment plant. These treat the toilet waste and to a level where the water meets the rules to be discharged into the groundwater.

This is what the neighbouring properties all have.

Next door to the east, Ramoth have a Klargester BA 450 BioDisc (now part of Kingspan Environmental) unit, that was installed by Dorset based Environmental Drain Services Ltd.

Talking to Environmental Drain Services:

  1. As it’s a treatment plant and not a septic tank the 7m minimum distance from a habitable dwelling rule does not apply.
  2. You need to be able to, on-going, access the lid to get into it. So you can build decking etc over it, but you can’t stand, drive or put earth over it.
  3. We should be able to rely on the¬†percolation¬†test / survey done for Ramoth way, as this is just next door. It’d be very unlucky for this to not be indicative of the Silver Spray ground.
Talking to Mark at Ramoth, there is not only the Klargester unit, with it’s small power supply, but the outlet feeds into a series of underground trenches, that in their case are closer to the house than the Klargester. These trenches are rock filled to help the¬†distribution¬†of the discharged treated water.

 

SAP calculations (Air leakage, U-values & thermal bridging)

As we head towards sending in the planning permission (we’ve had 2 positive pre-planning meetings), the design has been sent for a preliminary SAP analysis.

A fundamental objective is to create a thermally efficient building, so that over it’s lifetime, the amount of energy to keep the interior at a comfortable temperature and humidity more than offsets the cost (money and environmental cost) to achieve this efficiency.

In crude financial terms, the cost of heating an uninsulated house is nearly three times that of heating a modern well insulated property of the same living area.

Heated buildings loose energy in 3 ways:

  1. Air leakage through holes (hence an airtest and an “air-tight” building).
  2. Through the fabric of the building. The u-values of the materials measure how much heat is lost through them. This is primarily the walls, floors, windows, doors and roof of the building.
    The lower the U-value, the better that section of the structure. For example, a wall with a U-value of 1.0 will lose heat twice as fast as a wall with a U-value of 0.5.
  3. Through the cold bridges between the different elements. These are the¬†ő® (psi) values.
    –¬†“Thermal bridging occurs where the insulation¬†layer is penetrated by a material with a relatively¬†high thermal conductivity.”

The SAP assessor will look at all of these. They will multiply the¬†ő® (psi) values by the total¬†length¬†of their construction in the building to get a y-value. The y-value is analogous to an aggregated u-value for all the junctions in the building.

What y-values are used in the SAP calculations can have a big impact on the end figure.

Either:

  1. SAP assessor can use default value of 0.15, or
  2. Calculated value using the ő® (psi) values listed by the Building Regulations for Accredited Details (normally 0.8 or higher, or
  3. A calculated value using thermally modelled junction ő® (psi) values, which can come out as low as 0.04 depending upon construction details used.
The difference can, apparently be the equivalent of an open garage door on the side of the building ! (best to worst).

How to Place Shower Controls

An article on “How to Place Shower Controls for Bathing Bliss” at¬†http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/4690224/list?utm_source=Houzz&utm_campaign=u179&utm_medium=email&utm_content=gallery14.

With some careful planning, your next shower can be a complete joy to use. No blast of cold water when you turn it on, a controlled amount of water falling from each fixture, water that doesn’t spray out the shower door and a handheld cord that doesn’t wrap around fixtures.

  • Arrange controls for multiple showerheads in an order that would make sense to a guest. eg left hand shower controls on the left, or highest (“rain head”) shower jet controls to have the highest placement.
  • Having the shower’s controls at the opening of the shower makes heating things up easy and keeps you from getting wet in the process.
  • For a handheld shower control, consider the natural arch of the cord. I’ve found the cords want to curve at roughly 8 inches (20 centimeters). Notice the perfect placement of the shower’s handheld cord in this photo. It lines up with the temperature control in middle, and the hose connects to the wall right in line with the lower control valve.
  • Have your tile layout ready if you want the hose’s connection to fall in the center of a tile or on a grout joint. Siting the connection on a grout joint is easier for the tile installer, but most times it looks best to have it entirely on a full tile.