Thermal Store

This is part grabbing historical Thermal Store notes to one page, and part adding new notes.

Click here for notes on Thermal storage – pros & cons.

Looking at the Akvaterm thermal stores (which can go up to 5,000 litres !!)

From www.stovesonline.co.uk/wood_burning_stoves/Akvaterm-Geo-Thermal-Stores.html:

  • have a stratification baffle plate about a third of the way down the tank. (see photo below). This can be optionally upgraded to an insulated baffle to further improve performance but the added benefit is not huge as it is very good already.
  • Once the water above the baffle has been heated to a high temperature by the heat pump (50ÂșC-60ÂșC) it then shifts to heating the bottom two thirds of the tank to a much lower temperature suitable for underfloor heating (around 40ÂșC).
  • OR if / when the heat pump is generating lower temp water (often more efficient COP) it only targets the bottom section.
  • larger than normal lower domestic hot water coil. This is to ensure that the incoming mains water picks up as much heat from the bottom of the tank which holds the ‘cheaper’ heat produced at a high C.O.P.

From www.ecoangus.co.uk/Akvaterm_Solar_Plus_Accumulator_Tanks.html:

The AKVAir Solar Plus is available from 300-2000 litres and is 3 bar pressure rated. The tank has 4 coils, two for solar input and two for domestic hot water (DHW) and is divided by a baffle plate, approximately 60% below and 40% above the baffle. Each section contains one solar and one DHW coil and all coils are positioned vertically.

The AKVAir Solar is available from 300-2000 litres and is 3 bar pressure rated. The tank has 3 coils, one for solar input and two for domestic hot water (DHW).

From www.accumulatortanks.co.uk/Solarplus.htm:

Akva Solar plus coils diagram   Akva Solar diagram key

Akva Solar Plus coils + baffle plate     Akva Solar Plus coils

 

From www.akvaterm.fi/eng/Accumulators/AKVA_SOLAR.41.html:

akvasolarplus_460

 

From www.akvaterm.fi/eng/Accumulators/AKVA_GEO.206.html:

  • AKVA GEO is suited to all heat sources (others seem to be solar or something specific).
  • example layout:

akvageo_solar_kaavio_459

 

From www.navitron.org.uk/forum/index.php?topic=14183.0:

Heating System Schematic

Dual Cylinders?

From www.chelmerheating.co.uk/dual_cylinder_thermal_store_systems.html:

  • For larger domestic and commercial projects, our dedicated heating buffer cylinders are used in conjunction with our high-gain unvented cylinders to allow greater variation between heating and hot water demand.
  • The separate low-temperature heating buffer allows the small, infrequent heating demands of a property that is “up to temperature” to be met by stored renewable energy before activating the heat pump/boiler to reduce wasteful on/off cycling.

Double Sinks

A whole bunch of double sink ideas from Houzz:

http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/1547572

One benefit of a double vanity is the extra storage gained beneath. Lots of drawers and shelves mean a clutter-free bathroom and never missing a clean towel or a roll of toilet paper.

I seem to like those photos with tile floors, white sinks and light wooden units / drawers / shelves.

double sinks + storage

 

bathroom wood etc

 

double sinks + storage - 02

In terms of how the sinks are plumbed in, the sinks below have the pipes in through the sink unit (not from the wall).

But I am biased towards a single handle to control the flow rate and temp, coming out of a single outlet.

double sinks + storage - 03

Hot water heat recovery

What device(s) to put where to recapture as much of the heat from waste / grey water needs a decision.

The solutions from www.recoupenergysolutions.co.uk are clearly all very efficient and appear to be the same or similar to those that are well used in the US, where a lot of properties have their heating systems in the basement.

They are based on an “instant” transfer of the waste water heat to the mixer in the shower and also to the cold water feed to the water heating system.

BUT, the planned house will have clothes washing machines, a dishwasher and 2 showers on the ground floor. Being on the ground floor they wouldn’t work with all the recoupenergy solutions. Also a washing machine, dishwasher, bath (or hot tub) generates the waste water, some time after the hot water tank has been re-filled with mains cold water.

So in those circumstances, the www.esavep.com/products/hot-water-cylinders Heat Squirrel (scroll to the bottom) could be better and could provide a single (so a lot cheaper) whole house solution for all waste / grey hot water heat recovery. They are about £399 (not installed). The heat squirrel has a 120 litre capacity.

A key consideration / idea will be:

Can the waste water input be regulated so that only waste water that is warmer than the water in the heat squirrel is let in to it?

It seems that for a shower, the recoupenergy solutions will be the most efficient, but for the whole house, and the total cost, a single heat squirrel could be better than a heat squirrel and one or more recoupenergy solutions.

Heat Squirrel Schematic

Heat Squirrel - schematic
Heat Squirrel - installed

How to Place Shower Controls

An article on “How to Place Shower Controls for Bathing Bliss” at http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/4690224/list?utm_source=Houzz&utm_campaign=u179&utm_medium=email&utm_content=gallery14.

With some careful planning, your next shower can be a complete joy to use. No blast of cold water when you turn it on, a controlled amount of water falling from each fixture, water that doesn’t spray out the shower door and a handheld cord that doesn’t wrap around fixtures.

  • Arrange controls for multiple showerheads in an order that would make sense to a guest. eg left hand shower controls on the left, or highest (“rain head”) shower jet controls to have the highest placement.
  • Having the shower’s controls at the opening of the shower makes heating things up easy and keeps you from getting wet in the process.
  • For a handheld shower control, consider the natural arch of the cord. I’ve found the cords want to curve at roughly 8 inches (20 centimeters). Notice the perfect placement of the shower’s handheld cord in this photo. It lines up with the temperature control in middle, and the hose connects to the wall right in line with the lower control valve.
  • Have your tile layout ready if you want the hose’s connection to fall in the center of a tile or on a grout joint. Siting the connection on a grout joint is easier for the tile installer, but most times it looks best to have it entirely on a full tile.

Hot Water Heat Recovery Options

It looks like there is a new player in the UK market. OR one that I’d not previously spotted!

They have a good few shower tray / under shower options and those that can be more centrally integrated into your whole property hot water system.

From http://www.recoupenergysolutions.co.uk/our-range/recoup-retrofit/:

Our most popular waste water heat recovery system due to it’s great efficiencies, low price and superb all round performance. Ideal for new build applications, this product is sure to deliver results, whatever your criteria.


Recoup Tray+

Our tray is the perfect solution for apartments or ground floor en-suites. Achieving code in city apartments without renewables is notoriously difficult; this shower heat recovery system with flexible tray size is the answer that doesn’t cost the earth.

Building a wet room or have access issues? The Recoup Drain+ provides a great option. Finished in stainless steel and offering 50% efficiencies, this is a must have system for your self build or walk-in shower.

This compact WWHRS is easy to install, easy on the pocket and easy to maintain! As it’s name suggests, it’s ideal for retro-fitting in domestic and commercial properties. A very cost effective way to achieve efficiencies of up to 22%.

A system with great efficiencies specifically designed for large developments with good water pressure. This single walled exchanger provides up to 68% efficiency, so will tick a box for the Technical Director or architect looking for a cost effective solution to achieve code.

You Look Fine (mirror)

OK, so this site is my notes, thoughts etc. as I scoop up ideas, inspiration etc. for the house project.

Spotted this and had to add it.

Wouldn’t this be great in at least one bathroom or over the downstairs loo sink ?

– maybe put up an empty picture frame with the text painted on the wall ?