Thermodynamic Panels & a heat store or heat recovery system

Looking at one of the Thermodynamic Panel system PDFs:

One set up has a thermal store (a tank that heats up, and your heating is delivered by coils that go into this store, heat up and take that hot water to where you want it), and a second, linked to a pool seems to have a form of heat recover system, in that the colder water from the pool is going back in the loop for re-heating via the Thermodynamic panels and the thermal store tank.

 

For the thermal store the Akvaterm thermal store water tanks looked good at the 2012 Eco Expo in London.

  •  The Akvaterm Akvantti thermal stores are oblong which could be a better shape for the plant room. It’s available as 1400lt, 2000lt or 2400lt volumes. The 1,400 litre unit is £3,757.00 + £85 carriage.

Akvantti-Accumulator-Heat-Store-Tanks-4

 

A chunk more information on the concept and benefits of a thermal store (and their version of one) at http://www.greenspec.co.uk/thermal-storage.php:

Thermal storage – pros & cons

+ Provides effective buffering
+ Reduces boiler cycling
+ Allows for integration with low temp heating systems eg underfloor
+ Adds mains pressure to hot showers
+ Provides potable hot water
+ The use of a heat exchanger means that in most cases, thermal stores can be integrated with existing pressurised boiler circuits
+ Requires much smaller cold water tank then standard vented systems
+ Thermal storage is recognised by NHER software
– Heat can be lost through inefficient heat exchangers
– Storage temperature will usually have to be 10 deg C higher than required DHW temperature
– Cannot be used with existing DHW power showers and pumps
– Expensive and unvented storage, very expensive
– Vented stores require a header tank to be located above the heating systems

Points to consider when specifying a Thermal Store

  • The design of the heating system should be matched to the calculated peak heat load.
  • When including solar heating, ensure that there is extra capacity within the store to accommodate fluctuations.
  • Where a biomass boiler is being used, consider sizing the store to provide for the heat capacity generated in a load / firing
  • Consider designing not only for short-term anticipated capacity but possible future extensions to the system.
  • Consider stratification of water temperatures within the store, particularly where low-grade heating is provided. Effective separation between the hot water at the top of the tank and the cooler water at the bottom, can increase the time between charges.
  • Ensure that there is adequate insulation to the store (100mm + PU foam)
  • Ensure that there is adequate pipework insulation